We’re a journal dedicated to the evocative art, poetry, and prose. We like the inventive, the original, and the different. We want the electric. We want the pieces that you have emptied yourself into. We want the imagery that startles us. We want characters that stir something inside of us that we don't understand. So let the boundaries of the non-artistic world fall behind. Those won't be necessary here.






Since you guys (last time I read) were so low on money, why don't you try or do what Where Are You Press does and when people submit they have to pay a fee? And not like a $12 ridiculous amount fee, but something simple lie a $5 fee or even a $3 fee. I think it would help you so, so much more with your funds and people would see how serious this lit mag is. Mostly since the quality of your mag is so fine and professional. Way better than Where Are You Press.
by Anonymous

We actually do have Tip Jar Submissions! If you’d like to support us, you can submit through that portal for $3.50. WTR makes $2.31 off each Tip Jar submission (Submittable takes the rest) and it really helps keep us afloat!






OPEN CALL FOR SUBMISSIONS

To all you troublemakers,

Winter Tangerine Review is open for submissions for our fourth volume! 

We accept evocative poetry, prose, short film, dramatic writing (SF and DW begin on August 1st), and visual art. We are a print publication that aims to publish work that ignites, electrifies, and invents. We consider previously unpublished work, but anything that’s appeared on Tumblr is okay with us too! After our fantastic first and second and third submission sessions, we are so excited to begin receiving your tremendous submissions! Contributors receive a free copy of the volume their work appears in and retain all copyrights. For more information and to submit, click here!

Submit your masterpieces! Submit your laundry lists! Submit your desires, your secrets, your lies! 

I’m looking forward to reading you.

Sincerely,

Yasmin Belkhyr
Editor-in-Chief






Volume Three is WTR’s most explosive edition yet! This volume includes work from Jeanann Verlee, June Tang, J. Bradley, Kyle McCord, Liz Robbins, Joe Kapitan, Duarte Vitoria and so many more incredible poets, short story writers and artists. Imagine V3 as a pistol pointed at you by someone you loved, as an exploration into humanity, into how we affect each other, how we love one another. In terms of poetry, Jackson Trice’s work revolves around love as tender as an open wound, while Jason Primm’s work describes childhood and family with incredible subtly, with incredible softness, like the tremors of an earthquake. In Gabriella Gonzales’ work , love is violent, it’s obsessive, parasitic, growing and manifesting, boiling over, but still so painfully red and raw. The short stories in V3 delves into family, into the incredible bond between siblings, between mother and daughter, between what is foreign and what is home. In “On Pluto, Eating Starfish”, a young woman tries to make sense of a world which has given her a hospitalized mother, a distant step-father and a younger brother experimenting with blueberries, octopuses and the concept of regeneration. “Daily Bread” paints the unbearably poignant portrait of a desperate mother bearing the responsibility of two hungry children. Finally the art in V3 completely blows our minds. From oil paintings, to art installments, to sculptures, to fantastically detailed drawings created of just pencil and paper, WTR has truly published exhilarating, emotionally puling pieces of contemporary art that exists not just in it’s own universe, but in the space before a line break, the moment before a character decides on divorce. In Volume Three, WTR has captured the essence of forgiveness, of regret, of whimsy desire, and guttural guilt. V3 explores the love that is supermarket heartbreak, the love that is following the ghosts of drowned brothers, the love that is sitting outside someone’s house waiting, just waiting for them to come out.To pre-order your copy of Volume Three, click here!(Cover art is “Surface” by Ericka Craig, as part of her Water Series, featured in V3 of WTR)

Volume Three is WTR’s most explosive edition yet! This volume includes work from Jeanann Verlee, June Tang, J. Bradley, Kyle McCord, Liz Robbins, Joe Kapitan, Duarte Vitoria and so many more incredible poets, short story writers and artists.

Imagine V3 as a pistol pointed at you by someone you loved, as an exploration into humanity, into how we affect each other, how we love one another. In terms of poetry, Jackson Trice’s work revolves around love as tender as an open wound, while Jason Primm’s work describes childhood and family with incredible subtly, with incredible softness, like the tremors of an earthquake. In Gabriella Gonzales’ work , love is violent, it’s obsessive, parasitic, growing and manifesting, boiling over, but still so painfully red and raw.

The short stories in V3 delves into family, into the incredible bond between siblings, between mother and daughter, between what is foreign and what is home. In “On Pluto, Eating Starfish”, a young woman tries to make sense of a world which has given her a hospitalized mother, a distant step-father and a younger brother experimenting with blueberries, octopuses and the concept of regeneration. “Daily Bread” paints the unbearably poignant portrait of a desperate mother bearing the responsibility of two hungry children.

Finally the art in V3 completely blows our minds. From oil paintings, to art installments, to sculptures, to fantastically detailed drawings created of just pencil and paper, WTR has truly published exhilarating, emotionally puling pieces of contemporary art that exists not just in it’s own universe, but in the space before a line break, the moment before a character decides on divorce.

In Volume Three, WTR has captured the essence of forgiveness, of regret, of whimsy desire, and guttural guilt. V3 explores the love that is supermarket heartbreak, the love that is following the ghosts of drowned brothers, the love that is sitting outside someone’s house waiting, just waiting for them to come out.

To pre-order your copy of Volume Three, click here!

(
Cover art is “Surface” by Ericka Craig, as part of her Water Series, featured in V3 of WTR)






"

Combinations we’d never even dreamed of:
Names too long to remember.
Dark chocolate ice cream with raspberry
cheesecake pieces and caramel bonbons,
sweet cream ice cream with bumbleberry compote
and jordan almond fudge chunks.

After rinsing our mouths with toothpaste
and slicking lip gloss over our teeth
like a film of wax, we pounded the two miles
of sweating concrete every Wednesday at eight p.m,
an army of cheap earrings and thin ankles.

We didn’t ask our mothers if we could
shave our legs, but left shreds of bloody
toilet paper like one hundred tiny flames
in the trash can for them to clean up. We wore
our t-shirts low and swinging. We ogled at the brass
chins of boys too distracted to flirt back.

We filched twenties out of our mothers’ purses
and our fathers’ worn leather wallets and blew them every
week on portions of red velvet cheesecake
supreme so big they seemed impossible.

On Sundays, we went back after swimming
in the local pool, clad in the bikinis our mothers
did not allow us to buy. We liked the way
our salted hair swung damp over one shoulder.
We liked the way this left wet spots on our t-shirts,
liked any mark we left on anything.

Workers clad in red aprons scooped ice cream
and poured caramel and bleeding
maraschino cherries over chocolates and
thick sauces, mashing them together with two
silver spoons, turning and twisting this glob
so loudly it made our teeth hurt.

All of us thirteen and shining in our new bodies.

Our hands still pink and bruised from the
chlorine clutching cardboard cups disintegrating
under the waning heat of the Midwest.
None of our mothers were dying of cancer. None
of us worried about our children perishing in motor-boat
crashes or freak accidents at bowling alleys.

The gangly workers used to go down the line
of plastic trays: sweaty gummy worms,
cookie crumbs big as pennies, red and white sprinkles,
dark and white chocolate chips, caramel sauce
glazed over from the air conditioning, and each
time they would ask us if we wanted the topping,
spoons already full and sloping.

We nodded, eyes bright and hungry.
We said yes to everything. We thought
what magnificent women we’d be.

"

WHEN COLDSTONE CREAMERY FIRST OPENED by Hanel Baveja, Volume 2, Winter Tangerine Review  (via wildflowerveins)

(via wildflowerveins)






WHEN COLDSTONE CREAMERY FIRST OPENED by Hanel Baveja, Volume 2, Winter Tangerine Review

Combinations we’d never even dreamed of:
Names too long to remember.
Dark chocolate ice cream with raspberry
cheesecake pieces and caramel bonbons,
sweet cream ice cream with bumbleberry compote
and jordan almond fudge chunks.

After rinsing our mouths with toothpaste
and slicking lip gloss over our teeth
like a film of wax, we pounded the two miles
of sweating concrete every Wednesday at eight p.m,
an army of cheap earrings and thin ankles.

We didn’t ask our mothers if we could
shave our legs, but left shreds of bloody
toilet paper like one hundred tiny flames
in the trash can for them to clean up. We wore
our t-shirts low and swinging. We ogled at the brass
chins of boys too distracted to flirt back.

We filched twenties out of our mothers’ purses
and our fathers’ worn leather wallets and blew them every
week on portions of red velvet cheesecake
supreme so big they seemed impossible.

On Sundays, we went back after swimming
in the local pool, clad in the bikinis our mothers
did not allow us to buy. We liked the way
our salted hair swung damp over one shoulder.
We liked the way this left wet spots on our t-shirts,
liked any mark we left on anything.

Workers clad in red aprons scooped ice cream
and poured caramel and bleeding
maraschino cherries over chocolates and
thick sauces, mashing them together with two
silver spoons, turning and twisting this glob
so loudly it made our teeth hurt.

All of us thirteen and shining in our new bodies.

Our hands still pink and bruised from the
chlorine clutching cardboard cups disintegrating
under the waning heat of the Midwest.
None of our mothers were dying of cancer. None
of us worried about our children perishing in motor-boat
crashes or freak accidents at bowling alleys.

The gangly workers used to go down the line
of plastic trays: sweaty gummy worms,
cookie crumbs big as pennies, red and white sprinkles,
dark and white chocolate chips, caramel sauce
glazed over from the air conditioning, and each
time they would ask us if we wanted the topping,
spoons already full and sloping.
We nodded, eyes bright and hungry.

We said yes to everything. We thought
what magnificent women we’d be.











Winter Tangerine Review will be at the NYC Poetry Festival on July 27th! Come out to Governor’s Island for a beautiful day of sun, food and lines of poetry that’ll make you melt. At the White Horse Stage at 12:10PM, Jeanann Verlee, Victoria White, Gabriella Gonzales and Rachel Calnek-Sugin will be reading for WTR. There will be 250 poets reading at the Festival so be sure to stay for the other performances!For more information about the NYC Poetry Festival, click here.To RSVP to WTR’s reading, click here.

Winter Tangerine Review will be at the NYC Poetry Festival on July 27th! Come out to Governor’s Island for a beautiful day of sun, food and lines of poetry that’ll make you melt.

At the White Horse Stage at 12:10PM, Jeanann Verlee, Victoria White, Gabriella Gonzales and Rachel Calnek-Sugin will be reading for WTR. There will be 250 poets reading at the Festival so be sure to stay for the other performances!

For more information about the NYC Poetry Festival, click here.
To RSVP to WTR’s reading, click here.






Open Call for Managing Editor, Head of Social Media & More!

Hello cherry bombs,

Winter Tangerine Review is currently looking to fill the position of Managing Editor, and Director of Social Media & Marketing!

The managing editor will work hand-in-hand with the Editor-in-Chief as well as category editors to ensure the smooth running of the journal. The position is a dynamic one and the managing editor will be expected to handle a wide variety of responsibilities, from day to day activities to large-scale projects. Responsibilities of the managing editor include reviewing writing and art submissions, responding to contributor emails, sending out rejections and acceptances and interviewing potential staff, all alongside the Editor-in-Chief. The managing editor will also be expected to delegate certain tasks to staff teams such as the Social Media & Marketing team, the Editorial team and the Graphic Design team.  The time requirement will be about five-ten hours a week and varies drastically from week to week. 

The Director of Social Media & Marketing will run the WTR Twitter, Tumblr and Facebook page, create and send out blast-emails, curate relevant updates on a daily basis, develop an interactive audience, and design, create and manage promotions and social media campaigns. The Director of Social Media & Marketing will also delegate tasks to those on the Social Media & Marketing team, and compile quarterly reports on the growth and reach of WTR.

Click here for more information and to apply!






JAMES VIII by Lucy Wainger, Winter Tangerine Review, Volume One

My name is Lucy, which means light. I don’t write. Light is sometimes like heat. WhenI used to go to school, I never showed up on time. I had to run to my first class everymorning, and the heat was everywhere, slicking the back of my neck, blinding me in front of the Spanish teacher, whose voice is like the sound that scissor blades make swishing together; blinding me in front of the boy who sits in the front row, second seat from the right: boy with the paint-covered jeans, mermaidic girlfriend, mercurial fingers, long- lost descendant of some English king, and all drug dealers are named James, and I don’t write. Sometimes James draws pictures of our Spanish teacher leaning on her desk and sometimes I write circles around her hips which are more succinct than these sentences, and sometimes light is like heat, but there is a reason we all squint in the white white wintertime. Snow like ash falling onto that “unpopulated” island where there are no pens and there are no poets. You can push a boat made of dead trees off the shore. Off the white white sand. The water which is the color of an English king’s eyes while he watches his mistress’s execution. You can eat things with scales and no one will expect anything of you except to die in the light of the explosion or the heat of the radiation poisoning. You don’t want to die. I’m sorry. I don’t want to write, either.






So whats going to happen to WTR now that Amanda has left? Will Yasmin still be able to run it by herself? What does the future look like for WT?
by Anonymous

Things will stay the same! We’ve worked it out so there isn’t a major disturbance in the way WTR will be run now or in the future (as far as we can tell) even though Amanda has left. We will be opening applications for the managing editor position and if we find the perfect person, from our staff or someone outside of WTR, they’ll have the position, and if not, I’ll run WTR with the help of the editors. 

Yasmin :]






A Farewell from the Managing Editor

Hi, everyone:

Last March, when Yasmin and I started Winter Tangerine Review, I never imagined that it would become what it is today— in fact, I think we were both a bit naive to take on such a large project. But being the (lovely) headstrong individuals that we are, we let Winter Tangerine flourish. Before I knew it, I was corresponding with contributors and staff across the world and developing friendships with unbelievably talented artists. I can’t articulate how proud I feel every time someone tells Yasmin and I that Winter Tangerine was able to make a difference in their life. I’m no different— I cannot imagine what the past year and a half of my life would have been like without WTR. Unfortunately, it’s time for me to step down from my position as Managing Editor and move on to the next chapter in my life.

Being the Managing Editor (or Editor-in-Chief) of a non-profit journal is a 24-hour, 7-day-a-week job— that isn’t an exaggeration. I cannot even begin to count how many times Yasmin and I stayed up until 3 AM (on school nights, even) doing behind-the-scenes work for WTR. But as everyone says, when you’re doing something that you love, working all of the time doesn’t seem like work.

I’ve had so much fun and learned so much with WTR, but as I start college at Penn (Go Quakers!) this fall and wholly dedicate myself to developing my writing career, I have to make some sacrifices. There just isn’t a possible way for me to fully embrace the coming changes in my life and still put forth my best effort as Managing Editor, so I made the incredibly difficult decision to move on to new things.

You can still catch me around the small press world blogging for The Adroit Journal, managing social media for BOAAT Press, and interning for Dzanc Books. And if you really miss me, you can follow me on Twitter at @asilbwrites.

If you have ever interacted in any way with Winter Tangerine, I thank you so much for supporting our artistic endeavors.

With love,
Amanda Silberling






Hi! Is there a word limit for prose/poetry pieces? I can't seem to find it anywhere in the guidelines! Thanks :]
by Anonymous

There’s no line/word limit for poetry, and prose has a 4k word limit. :]






What does the future hold for WTR?
by Anonymous

Film screenings in NYC!
Tote bags with a real logo on them!
Possibility of online issues in addition to print volumes!
Micro-interviews with staff!
Possibility of WTR plays! Being performed! By real actors!
A poetry + prose contest AND chapbook contest, both with $$$ prizes!
FREE COOKIES!

(so yes, a lot)











teamcaptains:

Those of you looking to get involved in a literary community this summer should check out Winter Tangerine Review’s Summer Internship Program! I’m one of the Poetry Editors and can say with confidence that being active in the WTR community has helped me improve my writing by leaps and bounds. Today’s the last day to apply, so feel free to ask questions if you have any, and get your applications in ASAP! 

ST